Club Meeting on 23-Apr

Shirley Childs’ educational on speech evaluations

ANZAC Day

Johnny welcomed the Toastmasters and guests to the meeting. He continued with a sincere toast, focussed on Gallipoli, given the upcoming occasion to commemorate the ANZACs. When you imagine what the soldiers experienced, it was clear that there is respect for someone who fights for their country.

Clare provided the Word of the Night as “Commemorate”.

Table Topics

Benjamin challenged the room to consider, “why should we still commemorate ANZAC day, given the significant loss experienced by our Nation?”

Some great points were offered including;

  • So many people went to war and they fought for our freedoms that we have today.
  • We should learn from the lessons of the past
  • The fighting was one of the early challenges faced within our history and thus Australians forged an identity amongst other nations.
  • It serves as a tribute for those that serve including latter conflicts and common wars.

In one instance the date was unintentionally one member’s wedding anniversary which results in their mixed feelings about the date.

Laughmaster

Vicky provided light relief to the meeting, in which she recounted a trip to the hospital over the busy Easter period. When a small particle was trapped in her ear, she was advised to endure time spent in the waiting room. Vicky managed to see the light-side of her embarrassment when she realised the low-severity of issue compared to her fellow patients.

Evaluation Educational Workshop

Shirley provided her expertise on how to deliver a highly effective evaluation of fellow toastmasters. Vital to toastmaster meetings, evaluations help both the speaker and audience to improve their skills.

A few points to consider include;

  • Organise the evaluation to include a introduction, body and conclusion
  • Focus on what technique the speaker used, why it was used and how it affects the speech
  • Categorise observed techniques into the positive or negative effects on the speech.
  • The last point should highlight the most effective technique that the speaker used to finish on a ‘wow factor’.
  • A handle acronym to remember techniques is ‘GLOVES’ which stands for; Gesture, Language, Organisation, Vocal variety, Energy and Special.

Don’t Give Up On Your Dreams

Mark Paton gave an inspirational speech about determination in achieving your dreams. He told us a story about two people, John and Scott, who had a very different attitude towards life. The story proved how life is 10 percent of what happens to you, and 90 percent is how you react to it. They both had to deal with a challenge, and ended up with very different results.

John was a victim of a car accident and had to go at least six months of rehabilitation. The doctor said he could no longer continue to work as an electrician and enjoy rugby. John had to pay for his living expenses and so he took on administration work which he hated, but he continued to do. Despite all his challenges, his determination lead him to a full recovery and he returned to his passion as an electrician and rugby player.

Scott was a high achiever at school and university. He was known to be so smart that he hardly studied and was able to achieve high grades. Then midway through his 2nd year, he failed an exam, and decided to quit the university. Instead of dealing with the challenge of increasing his grades, he gave up.

You are Hacked

Benjamin Zhu explained how supercomputers are being used to influence our decisions without our knowledge. He told us about what computers can do right now. A smart microwave knows what time you have your meal, what emotions you’re having while you’re having a meal, and who is having a meal with you. YouTube was able to get his son hooked for 2 hours by recommending one video after another based the algorithms understanding of his son’s viewing behaviour. We now computers connected to special cameras that can measure your stress levels by looking at your eyes.

With all the personal information we give out over time and in real time, supercomputers will know us better than ourselves. If not already, supercomputers will be used to gain the upper-hand in political negotiations and to influence public opinion.

Ben suggested ways that we can protect our brains from being “hacked” by the computer, such as better education.

The Greatest Good

Clare Fraga gave a speech about her time as a protege, and how her mentor helped her through turbulent times.

“What is a mentor? How does it differ from a coach?” A mentor is someone who is someone you trust, is experienced, usually in life, etc. A coach is someone who helps you developing yourself when building a skill, such as a soccer coach, etc. A mentor is a trusted counsellor. The relationship is built on trust.

Clare met her mentor, Anton, when she was moved into a new role in another company as a result of a corporate restructure. Clare had doubts about her ability to perform her new role and preferred her previous role, but her mentor changed her perspective. Anton helped her see opportunities that aligned with her long term goals, and challenged her insecurities by having faith in her potential. She was also touched by Anton’s personal struggles before he had reached his level of success, and they remained friends for many years.

“The greatest good you can do for another is not just to share your riches but to reveal to him his own.” – Benjamin Disraeli

Benjamin Zhu’s speech “You are Hacked”

Co-authored by Matthew Anderson and Christopher Tso

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