Club Meeting on 23-Apr

Shirley Childs’ educational on speech evaluations

ANZAC Day

Johnny welcomed the Toastmasters and guests to the meeting. He continued with a sincere toast, focussed on Gallipoli, given the upcoming occasion to commemorate the ANZACs. When you imagine what the soldiers experienced, it was clear that there is respect for someone who fights for their country.

Clare provided the Word of the Night as “Commemorate”.

Table Topics

Benjamin challenged the room to consider, “why should we still commemorate ANZAC day, given the significant loss experienced by our Nation?”

Some great points were offered including;

  • So many people went to war and they fought for our freedoms that we have today.
  • We should learn from the lessons of the past
  • The fighting was one of the early challenges faced within our history and thus Australians forged an identity amongst other nations.
  • It serves as a tribute for those that serve including latter conflicts and common wars.

In one instance the date was unintentionally one member’s wedding anniversary which results in their mixed feelings about the date.

Laughmaster

Vicky provided light relief to the meeting, in which she recounted a trip to the hospital over the busy Easter period. When a small particle was trapped in her ear, she was advised to endure time spent in the waiting room. Vicky managed to see the light-side of her embarrassment when she realised the low-severity of issue compared to her fellow patients.

Evaluation Educational Workshop

Shirley provided her expertise on how to deliver a highly effective evaluation of fellow toastmasters. Vital to toastmaster meetings, evaluations help both the speaker and audience to improve their skills.

A few points to consider include;

  • Organise the evaluation to include a introduction, body and conclusion
  • Focus on what technique the speaker used, why it was used and how it affects the speech
  • Categorise observed techniques into the positive or negative effects on the speech.
  • The last point should highlight the most effective technique that the speaker used to finish on a ‘wow factor’.
  • A handle acronym to remember techniques is ‘GLOVES’ which stands for; Gesture, Language, Organisation, Vocal variety, Energy and Special.

Don’t Give Up On Your Dreams

Mark Paton gave an inspirational speech about determination in achieving your dreams. He told us a story about two people, John and Scott, who had a very different attitude towards life. The story proved how life is 10 percent of what happens to you, and 90 percent is how you react to it. They both had to deal with a challenge, and ended up with very different results.

John was a victim of a car accident and had to go at least six months of rehabilitation. The doctor said he could no longer continue to work as an electrician and enjoy rugby. John had to pay for his living expenses and so he took on administration work which he hated, but he continued to do. Despite all his challenges, his determination lead him to a full recovery and he returned to his passion as an electrician and rugby player.

Scott was a high achiever at school and university. He was known to be so smart that he hardly studied and was able to achieve high grades. Then midway through his 2nd year, he failed an exam, and decided to quit the university. Instead of dealing with the challenge of increasing his grades, he gave up.

You are Hacked

Benjamin Zhu explained how supercomputers are being used to influence our decisions without our knowledge. He told us about what computers can do right now. A smart microwave knows what time you have your meal, what emotions you’re having while you’re having a meal, and who is having a meal with you. YouTube was able to get his son hooked for 2 hours by recommending one video after another based the algorithms understanding of his son’s viewing behaviour. We now computers connected to special cameras that can measure your stress levels by looking at your eyes.

With all the personal information we give out over time and in real time, supercomputers will know us better than ourselves. If not already, supercomputers will be used to gain the upper-hand in political negotiations and to influence public opinion.

Ben suggested ways that we can protect our brains from being “hacked” by the computer, such as better education.

The Greatest Good

Clare Fraga gave a speech about her time as a protege, and how her mentor helped her through turbulent times.

“What is a mentor? How does it differ from a coach?” A mentor is someone who is someone you trust, is experienced, usually in life, etc. A coach is someone who helps you developing yourself when building a skill, such as a soccer coach, etc. A mentor is a trusted counsellor. The relationship is built on trust.

Clare met her mentor, Anton, when she was moved into a new role in another company as a result of a corporate restructure. Clare had doubts about her ability to perform her new role and preferred her previous role, but her mentor changed her perspective. Anton helped her see opportunities that aligned with her long term goals, and challenged her insecurities by having faith in her potential. She was also touched by Anton’s personal struggles before he had reached his level of success, and they remained friends for many years.

“The greatest good you can do for another is not just to share your riches but to reveal to him his own.” – Benjamin Disraeli

Benjamin Zhu’s speech “You are Hacked”

Co-authored by Matthew Anderson and Christopher Tso

Club Meeting on 9 Apr 2019

The theme of the meeting was “Mind, Body and Spirit” since World Health Day was just a few days earlier.

Toast

Toastmasters are familiar with needing to deliver an impromptu speech without little warning. Benjamin Zhu stepped up to the challenge to fill a vacancy and managed to start the meeting off strong with his thoughts on mind, body and spirit.

Word of the Night

Christopher Tso introduced the concept of ‘ecstasis’, where consciousness reaches another plane and creativity flows unimpeded. Athletes, artists and hopeful Toastmasters sometimes refer to this state as the ‘zone’ or ‘flow’. Christopher managed to slip in a few examples in a humorous manner and wished for others to experience the state.

Laughmaster

Johnny Manolelis always delivers the goods when required to make a room laugh. However, this time, he managed to keep the room in suspense as he told a story where a man stopped to help a poor person. But as the charitable man handed over his money, he stopped and questioned how another man could become so unfortunate. How can a man who doesn’t smoke, drink, sleep around or gamble end up in a gutter, without money or decency? Perhaps there lies the reason?

Table Topics

Clare Fraga offered some topical questions for the room to ponder in regard to their mind, spirit and body.

  • Is laughter really the best medicine?
  • Are you what you eat?
  • Does Nike’s slogan “What you do is up to you. Just do it.” inspire you?
  • Do you think fast food is on the way out?
  • “Silence isn’t empty, it’s full of answers”. What does this mean?

Prepared Speeches

Trophy Kids

Matt Anderson asked us “what sport you would like your kids to play”? Matt explored what is involved in aiming for professional sports and why Ultimate can be a great sport for personal development. This speech was part of the Toastmasters Pathways to demonstrate that feedback can be implemented by the speaker.

Listening Filter

Shirley Childs presented a workshop on retention through listening. It is estimated that listeners only retain approximately 25% of information. We explored some of the factors that affect our ability to listen. Shirley presented this in an engaging manner as an example on how to assist your audience to retain more information.

Planning My Big Event

Johnny Manolelis demonstrated how inspiring people was his dream. Now he is making that dream a reality. Johnny set a challenging target of hosting a large public speaking event and is now on the cusp of achieving his target. In a clever business pitch, he managed convince the room to follow his dynamic leadership. Did I mention that he has even been inspired enough to publish a book?!

Club Meeting on 26 Mar 2019

“The Great Debate” was the theme of the night. Johnny gave a Toast to “Debate”, because that is how everyone discusses what they want, and no one is absolutely right or wrong. Without discussion, the world would not be the same.

Word of the Night

“Deliberation” was the word that Clare wanted us to use during the meeting. She gave plenty of examples, such as “the jury returned verdict after four hours of deliberation”.

Laughmaster

Matt Anderson delivered a humorous story based on his work in motorsports. A business supplier of his discovered hundreds of dead crows on the race track. The cause of death appeared to be due to vehicle impacts. There was growing environmental concern about the race track, and so Matt did an investigation. Eventually, Matt spoke to a scientifically-minded colleague who explained to him the exact cause of death.

Table Topics – The Great Debate

“The cost of detergent is increasing. Romans used urine to clean clothes. Should budget-minded Australians do the same?”. This was the topic that we were asked to debate. Johnny randomly selected three speakers on each side to either speak affirmative or against the proposal.

The affirmative side won by a narrow margin, based on the chairman’s scoring on content and delivery. The performance was so good, that hopefully no one took it seriously and decided to wear clothes that smell of urine!

Prepared Speeches

Are we controlled by our microwaves?, by Benjamin Zhu

Ben posted an important question: “Are we outsourcing too much parenting to the Internet?” As most people now rely on their smartphone and other smart devices to tell them what to do, we’ve lost some level of control. And sometimes, losing control can even cost lives, as in the case of the Boeing 737 crash which was caused by a software malfunction.

He also talked about smart home appliances, such as Google Home and Amazon’s Smart Microwave knowing more about our lives than we do, and controlling more of our lives. A smart microwave can collect data for health insurance companies because it knows your eating and living habits.

The Life Choices We Make, by Mel Colgar

Mel explained how vision of the future affects the choices we make everyday. All the small actions we take is going to support our vision, whether you know it or not. Your vision of what life will be in 5-10 years will have sights and sounds, such as the bustling noise of the city, or the tranquility of living in the countryside. A good exercise to prove how powerful your vision is to rewind back 5-10 years, and recall the vision that you had about your life today. Very likely, you’re now living your vision and the past version of you would be happy with where you are now.

Being Ordinary is a Blessing, by Helena Zhang

Helena delivered her first speech at Toastmasters. She shared a couple of stories that touched her personally… a girl who was once beautiful and today looks much older than her age, and gets scolded by her husband in public… and a friend who had a very successful career in accounting and suddenly forced into early retirement because of health problems. Those stories made her appreciate her life more, even though she has an ordinary life and an ordinary husband.